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ESCAPE FROM FRAMES

[1226]from "PG"-19 March 2004:
RE: No. 1137, Page 73 [Hi-Q Fusion Puzzle, by IDEALTM ]
I notice that there is an entry on your web page regarding the Hi-Q Fusion Puzzle. I also have had this for many years and never been able to solve it. My version of it was manufactured by PETER PAN PLAYTHINGSTM

Do you have any more information on a solution to this puzzle or where this may be found.

Posts anywhere on the internet are few and far between on this one and I have to jump on any lead I can find to ascertain the solution to this puzzle.

Regards

"PG"
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ALSO, from "TP"-9 March 2004:
Can anybody help. I've had this puzzle for absolutely years and cannot figure it out. Its called hi-q fusion. it contains 22 blue and red pieces and am in desperate need of the solution.
"TP"
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ALSO, from "DC"-25 March 2004:
I too have had this puzzle for years and still can't do it. I'm passing it on to my son.

Did you ever find an answer?

"DC"
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from Jim McW--25 March 2004:
It looks as though there's at least two editions of this puzzle (not strictly a jigsaw puzzle, but interesting, nonetheless) by different companies. We asked all the correspondents for pictures, and we got the following reply
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from "DC"-25 March 2004:
Hello Jim,

Thanks for your prompt reply and interest.

I've taken a couple of pictures. The second one shows the bits individually - could even create your own if you are into some serious frustration. Rubik's Cube has nothing on this beastie....
Hi-Q Fusion"Hi-Q Fusion", 22 plastic pieces, PETER PAN PLAYTHINGSTM
Hi-Q Fusion"Hi-Q Fusion", the separate pieces.

Regards,

"DC"
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from Jim McW--25 March 2004:
Does anyone care to share the solution with us?
Thanks, Jim McW
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from Jim McW--28 March 2004:
We have been introduced to the following link as a source for a possible solution:
The Poly Pages
Once there, look in the menu at the left, and click on "Polyhexes". Just below the example of "Tetrahexes" is the section devoted to "Pentahexes". See the first illustration under the title of that section.
Thanks, Jim McW
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from Jim McW--16 September 2006:
We believe the link just above has been replaced by:
http://www.recmath.com/PolyPages/.
Respond or comment (note inquiry number)

[1227]from "anonymous"-6 March 2004:
I have a puzzle of disney's mickey mouse club-7 characters appearing in it. where can i find more info, please?
"anonymous"
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from Jim McW--17 March 2004:
We would love to see a picture or scan or photocopy of your puzzle.
Thanks, Jim McW
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from "anonymous"--18 March 2004:
Thanks for your response-here is pic:
Mickey Mouse Club"Mickey Mouse Club", WHITMANTM, frametray.

"anonymous"
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from Jim McW--26 March 2004:
See No. 184, Page 13; No. 290, Page 21; and No. 724, Page 50 for related items.
Dear "anonymous", your puzzle seems to relate to a later period in the history of the Mickey Mouse Club. I would estimate that it was published during the 1970's.
Thanks, Jim McW
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[1228]from "SW"-20 March 2004:
I just bought a Jigette and never knew they existed. One piece is missing as noted in pencil on the front. (Wish they had not done that.) The box graphics are to die for! On the back is a list of the dates this puzzle was put together. Title is "The Board's Head Inn". Dates begin in 1937 and end in 1958.
"SW"
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from Jim McW--26 March 2004:
See No. 1016, Page 67
Anne Williams, in her Jigsaw Puzzles: An Illustrated History and Price Guide, says that Jigette was produced by Hamblet Studios during the 1930's. Here's a couple of pictures:
Jigette Boxbox, JIGETTE PUZZLE. Lighthouse"Lighthouse", JIGETTE, 1930's.
Thanks, Jim McW
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from "SW"--4 April 2004:
OK, here is the one I found not long ago. There is one piece missing. But, I got it mostly for the graphics on the box. It would look great in a deep wall box with glass front.:
Jigette Boxbox, "The Boar's Head Inn", JIGETTE.
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[1229]from "CM"-22 March 2004:
Hi,
I recently purchased an older (I think) puzzle. It is in a box and has four cards with different Victorian scenes on them. Then there are blocks with the scenes on the blocks. Mixed up they are the puzzle. My mom says that it is not old and you can buy that type of puzzle anywhere. How can I tell if it is old or not? It sure looks old. The wood looks old. Reproductions abound though and I just can't tell.
Can you give me some information?
Thank you
"CM"
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from Jim McW --26 March 2004:
I can't tell you much, probably, but I can't tell you anything without at least having a scan or photocopy of the box. The puzzle, blocks, and /or cards would be nice, too. If you can, send pictures, and we will try to post them with your question on our Q&A pages. Some of our regular visitors may know something about them.
Thanks, Jim McW
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from "CM"--29 March 2004:
Thanks for answering my letter. I finally got around to photographing the puzzle [below]. I am hoping someone will know a little bit about it. All the pieces are here. The only problem is that when I bought it the top had been shut using masking tape that is why the picture on the front of the box is scraped off. I don't know why anyone would do that. If you could just tell me if it is old or a reproduction. I have a bet with my mom.
Thanks for your time, "CM"
Block puzzle"Block puzzle", maker, title, and date unknown.
Block puzzle boxbox     blocks"blocks" pictures"pictures", box illustration"box illustration" hinge"hinge" hinge"hinge", another view
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from "An Old Collector" --5 April 2004:
They look pretty genuine to me but I don't know about American repro's, they are very typical of the 1920's - 30's. It was not uncommon to have no name of manufacture; if there was it might well have been scraped off the top.
From the picture it is also very difficult to decide on a probable country of origin, Germany was most likely source ( Bavaria ) but Britain and France also produced blocks. I don't think they are French as the box is not in their style. There should be five pictures, plus one on the box, making six in all, one for each of the six block sides.
Regards,
"An Old Collector"
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from "J.S."--5 April 2004:
The block puzzle pictured is a reproduction, probably made in the 1970s. I've been told that they were made in China and sold primarily in New York City. Notice the pictures and the blocks, they are all equally faded and the fading is very consistant across each page. Notice the edges of the blocks, they are still sharp and have no wear. You might think that this puzzle was carefully protected or long forgotten on a shelf. Then you should see pale images of the blocks in the bottom of the box and the sides of the blocks that have been face down for a century would be faded differently then the sides that were exposed. There is no foxing in the box or on the pieces.
You have an old puzzle, but it is only 25-30 years old!
"J.S."
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from Anne Williams--5 August 2004:
This is one of the most common reproductions found in the U.S.
Shackman, a novelty manufacturer and importer in New York City, sold copies for many years, at least into the late 1970s. Shackman wholesaled its wares to stores all over the U.S.
Page 59 in my 1990 book illustrates one of the six pictures. In my copy of the puzzle, the guide picture are on thick cardboard, rather than the thin paper that is typical of the originals. Also the wood of the box is luaun, which comes from the Philippines and was not used by European manufacturers in the early 20th century.
Anne Williams. puzzles@bates.edu
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[1230]from "AW"-20 March 2004:
I've come across a puzzle with a stack of board games from the 40's. It is a Built-Rite inlaid puzzle. No. 91. I'm just wondering if the people in it are of any significance. At first, I thought maybe it was Roy Rogers and Dale Evans, but the horses don't seem right. Any info you could give me would be GREATLY appreciated. I've included a picture.
westernwestern, title and date unknown. Thanks,
"AW"
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from Jim McW --26 March 2004:
I think you're right that they are not Roy Rogers and Dale Evans. Those horses are NOT Trigger and Buttermilk!
It looks like the 1950's to me, but I suppose it could be a bit earlier.
Thanks, Jim McW
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[1231]from "WN"-1 April 2004:
Have tried finding history of 3 puzzles handed down.
1. Perfect Picture, 375 pcs Titled "HI-YA GRAMP" has NO. 250 on box.

2. Perfect Picture, 325 pcs, titled "Hunter's Daybreak" has No. 1216 on box

3. Guild picture puzzle, 300 pc, titled "found at last",has No. 2900 on box

Any possibility you could date these puzzles for me.

Thank You

"WN"
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from Jim McW--26 March 2004:
"Hi-Ya Gramp" sounds very much like a Hy Hintermeister title. Other similar works include "Give Up Gramp", "Look Out Gramp", "Sorry Gramp", "Step On It Gramp", "Take It Easy Gramp", "The Touchdown", "Gotcha Gramp", "Hang On Gramp", and possibly others.
We are not familiar with "Hunter's Daybreak", although a puzzle entitled "Daybreak and the Hunters", by Relyea, is illustrated in Chris McCann's book, Master Pieces: the Art History of Jigsaw Puzzles, and Sterling Mason includes a citation of a puzzle entitled "Daybreak and the Hunt is On".
The third puzzle is probably based on the same artwork as the TUCO puzzle, "Found At Last", by Harold Anderson.
It is impossible to say without looking at the boxes, but I would guess that they were published in the 1940's or 1950's or so.
Thanks, Jim McW
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[1232]from "JM"-4 April 2004:
Hello, could you help me, have you ever heard of a jigsaw called ' labeth walk lupino lane with teddie st denis', hand signed and if so could you give me an idea of the price
thank you
"JM"
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from Jim McW--4 April 2004:
Lumar (U.K.) made a series of " Lambeth Walk " puzzles in the 1930's, one of which is:
Lambeth Walk"Lambeth Walk", LUMAR, 1930's.
The legend on the box continues, "'Lupino Lane' with Teddie St Denis in 'Me and My Girl' at the Victoria Palace, the Home of the Lambeth Walk".
We're not sure whose signature appears on the puzzle, but we would assume it is that of Teddie St Denis.
We don't offer appraisals.
Thanks, Jim McW
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[1233]from "L5"-5 April 2004:
Dear Sirs,

I found your e-page recently and i was wondering if you could help me find a 6000 piece MB puzzle.

I haven't been able to find this company in the internet, is it still running?
Secondly, can you inform me from your personal experiance if puzzle companies hold records of some older puzzles?
I am searching for a 1986's Mb Puzzle with the depiction of the "Troian War"
"L5"
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from Jim McW--4 April 2004:
We assume that some puzzle producers do keep records of past puzzles, but we have no direct knowledge thereof. We also assume that in most cases, these records are not available for public use. Also, we are not aware of MILTON BRADLEYTM puzzles of more than 3000 pieces. Has anyone heard of such puzzles? Any ideas?
Thanks, Jim McW
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[1234]from "JG"-2 April 2004:
My daughter and I would like to visit a factory to see how puzzles are made.
Are there any such factories in the Western United States?

Thanks,
"JG"
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from Jim McW--5 April 2004:
See no. 624, Page 44, and no. 1181, Page 75.
We are not aware of any factories much west of the Mississippi, and we are still in doubt as to whether such tours are easily arranged. However, it might be just as interesting (if not more so) to tour one of the shops where jigsaw puzzles are cut by hand, as Anne Williams suggests in no. 1181, Page 75.
Thanks, Jim McW
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[1235]from "SM"-6 April 2004:
Dear Sir: I have a Tuck's Zag-Zaw picture puzzle...All I know of it is that it belonged to my Grandmother..she may have received it from her mother....Any information you could give me would be vary much appreciated or direction to where I can find more information....

Particulars about this puzzle are as follows.....
Raphael Tuck & Sons Ltd.
...London
.... 55 pieces
.... 7 x 51/4"
.... "A Labour of Love" by M. Bowley

There is a few numbers on the box maybe 25p ....It is in its original box tied with a I think old ribbon... and all the pieces are there....it is quite complicated but fun to do.....

Thank you
"SM"
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from Jim McW--5 April 2004:
See Geert Bekkering's site of Raphael Tuck Jigsaw Puzzles. Also, see our Tuck's Zag Zaw Page.
We would love to post a picture of your puzzles and the box on the same page, if you care to share them with us. Note no. 1255, below.
Thanks, Jim McW
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[1236]from "LJ"-12 April 2004:
I have a Guild Picture Puzzle #2900:29, the title The Sleigh Ride with 304 pieces to it. I was wondering how old it is. I can't seem to find this puzzle listed anywhere.

Thank you for your help.

Thanks again.
"LJ"
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from Jim McW--15 April 2004:
Is this the same picture? :
Sleigh Ride"Sleigh Ride", WHITMAN MASTERPIECETM
Your puzzle sounds as though it might date from the 1940's or 1950's, but it's impossible to say without seeing a picture of it.
Thanks, Jim McW
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[1237]from "ZM"-12 April 2004:
Hi,

Thank you for the opportunity to get some information on building puzzles.

#1. What is the machine called that makes the puzzles?

#2. Can these machines be bought second hand?

#3. Where does one find the pictures for the puzzles?

Thank you for your time.

Regards,
"ZM"
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from Jim McW--19 April 2004:
First, see our FAQ page [How are jigsaw puzzles made?].
I might add that we are not puzzle manufacturers, so we know very little about the process, but our impression is that the machines are big and rather expensive. In some cases, they seem to have been designed and built especially for a particular company. We have heard of smaller machines, but we assume that they are limited to smaller puzzles, cut on thinner card material.
We assume that companies acquire pictures for puzzles by a variety of methods, including commissioning artists and photographers, and canvassing agents.
Thanks, Jim McW
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[1238]from "GS"-15 April 2004:
RE: Inquiry 975, Page 62
I have the original painting from 1929 but would love to know more about the artist.
Can anyone help?

"GS"
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from Jim McW--19 April 2004:
You are referring to this picture:
Suspense"Suspense", MILTON BRADLEYTM.
Does anyone know the artist?
Thanks, Jim McW
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[1239]from "MA"-15 April 2004:
hi
i am looking for a puzzle of the signatures of the us presidents c 1965
thanks

"MA"
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from Jim McW--19 April 2004:
Does anyone recognize this description? Any idea who made the puzzle?
Thanks, Jim McW
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[1240]from "AU"-15 April 2004:
Hello, I am researching jigsaw puzzles for one of my class assignments. I have 3 major questions.
1.I would like to know the different wood used to make jigsaw puzzles in Europe, Asia, and the U.S. (Or, was mahagony and plywood just the most widely used throughout the 19th Century in these countries? Were there regional differences?)
2. Also, the kinds of tools used aside from coping saw or the treadle-saw, if there were any others used during this time period.
3.How long would it have taken an early puzzle-maker to create a wooden jigsaw puzzle, as opposed to a modern wood puzzle-maker of the 21st Century?

Thanks,
"AU"
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from Jim McW--24 April 2004:
Different kinds of woods seem to have been used in jigsaw puzzles. Early favorites were apparently mahogany and cedar. As plywood became more readily available, and especially after higher grades of plywood became widely available, that became the most common material for wooden puzzles.
One of the major advancements over the treadle-operated jigsaw was the electric jigsaw in the mid-20th century. Much later, we have seen the development of jigsaw-cutting by water-jet and by laser. These latter, mechanical methods would presumably cut puzzles very quickly. However, I suspect that the cutting time for a treadle jigsaw cutter in 1900 would have been comparable with that of a cutter using an electric jigsaw today.
Anyone have additional information or corrections?
Thanks, Jim McW
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from Keith--26 April 2004:
The earliest English Dissections were pasted on to hardwoods such as oak ( very rare ), walnut, cedar and mahogany, which seemed to be the most commonly used from the eighteenth century through the nineteenth and into the early twentieth century. Mahogany was being used for furniture making and was available in sheets as thin as 3/16 inch but these woods were very expensive. The fine grain made it ideal for the purpose as it was less inclined to warp than most other woods, As softwoods gradually took over a paper backing sheet or another puzzle was usually used on the reverse side to prevent warping and equally important to prevent the wood splintering and breaking at the interlocking borders when being cut.

French puzzles were of cheap very thin softwood that was covered in paper over the sides, to hide rough edges they were interlocking from a much earlier date in the nineteenth century using a special jig to hold the puzzle whilst being cut.

The earliest boxes were made from oak with dove-tailed corners and sliding lids but quickly died out, by about 1820 most boxes were made in the cheaper softwoods with mahogany or cedar being used for the more expensive puzzles, but these were no longer dovetailed, the corners being mitred fixed with wooden ties and glued together. Some manufacturers would cheat and use softwood for the bottom of the box. The cheaper puzzles were sold in chip-boxes sometimes called Tunbridge Boxes. In 1835 Edward Wallis marketed a new box in the form of a book with the name tooled in gilt on a leather spine.

The tools used were available to any handyman, Turners and Toymakers would fill in their slack times by dissecting puzzles, these were often the lowest paid artisans, marquetry or fret saws had been in use for some time and had a reach of twenty inches from saw to bar. The treadle jigsaw was used by the Tunbridge marquetry makers in the eighteenth century and would have been available to the larger firms and established manufacturers but almost any handyman wanting to make a living could find tools and materials to make dissected puzzles.
Keith
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This is PAGE SEVENTY-EIGHT of the Questions and Answers section of puzzlehistory.com.

Chris McCann's book,Master Pieces: the Art History of Jigsaw Puzzles.

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