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ESCAPE FROM FRAMES

[1786]from Jim McW--9 February 2007:
It has been brought to our attention that the following was printed in the "The Evening News" (London), 15 August, 1919.:

To~night's Gossip. -- By the Londoner.
For an hour and more we have been playing with jig-saw puzzles, and I have been serenely happy. so happy that if I were a German philosopher I should begin to argue about it and make notes for a volume on the philosophy of happiness, with an appendix on the inwardness of the jigsawismus, the compelling humour which makes people play at jig-saw.


When a lot of little things like the jig-saw pieces fit into their places, you have happiness. They fitted like that to-day. I had swum out alone in the sea and come back lifted and borne along by the waves that broke on the pebbles. Pleasantly weary with long swimming I sat by an open window in the sun, smoking an old pipe and knowing not a care in the world. It was then that I and the little girl fell to playing at the jig-saw puzzles.


There are two of them, each in a chocolate covered case. We bought them, she and I, at the toyshop beside the corner of the Rue de la Bride which turns out of the market place in Bruges. That was in a year before the Germans came to Bruges, in the peaceful year when Belgium was a kind old aunt who took us for the holidays.


We saw the two puzzles in the shop window and we went in to buy them both. The little girl who demanded them had hardly come to the age that asks more difficult puzzles than those simple affairs in which the picture is made up of square blocks. But she was born to demand what she wanted and to have it if it were anything that an obedient daddy might come by. She asked for the puzzles and had them. To speak exactly, she named them as puggles. By some miracle the puggles have survived to this day, not a piece missing. In that sacred language, the little language of the family, they are still called the puggles.


One of them, when you fit in all the pieces, shows you the market place and the brown belfry; you can have just a glimpse of the corner of the street where the puggles were bought. This is the one I play with when I and the little girl play against each other. When the second puggle is achieved, you see the Minnewater with the shadows of the trees upon it, the shadow of the spire of the church which is called Our Dear Lady's Church. This has more pieces than the other puggle, and is a very difficult puggle indeed. I do not play with it: but the little fingers which are so much cleverer than mine can put it together, nine times out of ten, before I am ready with my market place.


"This game," says the French inscription on the cover, "amuses and occupies the children: it develops their intelligence and patience." It can even develop the intelligence of a father not notable in his family for intelligence, who has yet been praised to-day for his swift construction of the market place. As for patience, it must be the benign influence of the game which has made the daughter so patient of his inferior skill. I did not win: I was not born under the star which shines for winners of great or little games. But I have been amused and occupied. Also I was happy: it seemed to me that I had at that moment all that a man should want.


The puggles cost a franc apiece. Add to the puggles a few matters that have no price to them, old memories of happy days, the light air that stirs the curtain at the window, and that which, as it is written, a man may not buy with all the substance of his house. You will see that happiness is cheap enough. Which is comfortable knowledge, since they say that everything is dear and like to be dearer."
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[1787]from "KW"--19 February 2007:
Hi -
I was forwarded to your site by [the people] at the Tuco puzzle site, who [were] stymied in helping me search for a puzzle I had as a kid growing up in the late 50's / early 60's.

It had super thick pieces, so I believe it is a Tuco, probably from the same series or vintage as the interlocking variety "for older children," such as the one I have recently found called "Circus Days," which is of children watching a clown put his makeup on.

I recently found the clown puzzle on the internet, but am still searching for the other puzzle, which shows children getting on or off the school bus on a rainy day. As I recall there is a policeman or uniformed crosswalk guard present with the children, and the school is shown across the street in the background. Unfortunately I have no idea what the name of the puzzle is, and I don't have any other pertinent info about it...

Does this puzzle sound at all to you? I look forward to hearing from you with any helpful information you may be able to provide regarding the school bus puzzle...

Thanks a million for your help.Regards,
"KW"
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from Jim McW--20 February 2007:
Here's a picture of Circus Days:
Circus Days" Circus Days ", TUCO ADVANCED CHILDRENS INTERLOCKING [late 1950's?]

Does anyone recognize the other puzzle, the one "KW" still hasn't found?
Thanks, Jim McW
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[1788]from "RH"--19 February 2007:
Hi,
I just found your website and hope you can help me. I have recently purchased a puzzle of a ship: Playtime House #1704 - 1000 pieces.
I know it must come from a well-known sea painting because I have a print on my wall of exactly the same ship. The box doesn't name the ship, the artist or the painting. (neither does the print I have, but it's too much of a coincidence).
Would you be able to recognize what ship the painting is of based on this information of the puzzle?
Would it help if I sent a picture of the ship?
thanks,
"RH"
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from Jim McW--19 February 2007:
Dear puzzler,
We're drawing a blank, so far. We're not familiar with Playtime House puzzles of 1000 pieces. A picture of the ship might help, especially if we are able to post it with your question. Even if we don't have the answer, someone else in the community may know something.
Thanks, Jim McW
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from "RH"--18 February 2007:
Hi James,
Here are two pictures that show my puzzle. One is the cover and one is the side. There are no other marking or writing on the box. Mainly I would like to identify the ship as it implies it is a work of fine art. Any other info on the puzzle would be appreciated. Did you say that Playtime house are not known for 1000 piece puzzles?
thanks again,
"RH"
maritime scene, unknown title, PLAYTIME HOUSE FINE ARTS
boxbox
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from Jim McW--20 February 2007:
Well, obviously, we were wrong: Playtime House DID make a Fine Arts series, with 1000 pieces!
We believe this dates from the 1950's or, possibly, the early 1960's. It does resemble several maritime pictures, for instance, " Homeward Bound ". See also NO. 1261, Page 80, for another maritime puzzle which sounds somewhat similar. Another similar title is " Rounding the Cape ". Does anyone know the title or the artist of the puzzle pictured above?
Thanks, Jim McW
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from Jim, PerfectPicturePuzzle.com --15 March 2007:
Jim,
I don't know what the title for this puzzle is in Playtime House Fine Arts but it can also be found in Perfect Picture Puzzles under the title "Under Full Sail" by artist Dey DeRibcowsky. A cropped version of the same picture can also be found in Perfect Picture Puzzles under the title "All Sails Spread" and "The Red Star".
Jim
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from Jim McW--15 March 2007:
You are right, it is very similar to this puzzle:
box" Under Full Sail ", WHITMAN MASTERPIECE
Thanks, Jim McW
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from Jim, PerfectPicturePuzzle.com --16 March 2007:
Jim, I know there are numerous paintings of sailing themes, all more or less similar. But the picture I am refering to is not similar - it is the same.
I'm sure you're aware of the fact that the same name was often used on different pictures. The Perfect Picture Puzzle version of "Under Full Sail" is the exact same picture as on the Playtime House box cover. The Masterpiece puzzle "Under Full Sail" that you showed is obviously not the same picture, even though it has the same name.
And the manfacturers make things even more confusing by using different names for the same picture, as shown in the other two titles I referenced. They are of the same DeRibcowsky painting, just a cropped view and a different name.
Hope this clears it up some...
Jim
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from Jim McW--17 March 2007:
It does clear things up, as far as I'm concerned. Even though I know that the same pictures were used with different names and different pictures were used with the same names, it seems easy to get confused by these. I went to your website, PerfectPicturePuzzle.com, and looked at "Tall Ships", and that immediately put things into perspective. You've really been making an impressive jigsaw puzzle resource there!
Thanks, Jim McW
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from "RH"--17 March 2007:
Thanks Jim (and Jim),
You have solved a long standing "puzzle" for me. The name of the painting and the artist. As I mentioned earlier, it started when I purchased a print (1920's) of this painting. I then was amazed to see the same picture on a puzzle at a collectables market (which I of course snapped up). The painting is indeed by an artist named Dey de Ribcowsky. He was born in Bulgaria and settled in California in 1920 and started a series of paintings known for their maritime themes and particularly their spectacular sunsets. The painting is probably known more specifically by the name "Red Star" which makes sense since if one looks at the ship closely, it does indeed have a red star on it (in a circle). I had thought perhaps this makes it a Soviet ship since this was about the time of the Bolshevik Revolution. My next challenge is to actually identify the ship (and make the puzzle of course): I know, I love a challenge, but don't all puzzlers? Thanks for all the hard work you have both done on your web sites and the help you give.
"RH"
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[1789]from "HC"--25 February 2007:
Here is a picture of a puzzle I have.:
The Lace Maker" The Lace Maker ", by Vermeer, 20TH CENTURY PICTURE PUZZLE.

Can you tell me anything about it (How old is it? What is it's current value? Anything?).

I would appreciate any information.

Thank You.
"HC"
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from Jim McW--25 February 2007:
Dear puzzler,
Once again, we are stumped. We would guess WHITMAN, approximately the 1950's, but we don't find that title in that series. Of course, the original painting is well known. We will do further research..
Thanks, Jim McW
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[1790]from "BSW"--24 February 2007:
I was wondering about a box of puzzles I have There are two puzzles in the box and a spare one. I have the duck Puzzle on the cover too. It says Whitman Publishing co, Made in the USA no 4121 :15
They are kind of cute and I was wondering about them
Thanks
"BSW"
duckduck, WHITMANTM children's puzzle
scotty dogscotty dog, WHITMANTM children's puzzle
henhen, WHITMANTM children's puzzle
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from Jim McW--25 February 2007:
Well, you don't say what your question is, so it is hard for us to answer, especially since we don't know much about this series. We would guess the 1950's from the general style. We would agree that they are very cute!
Thanks, Jim McW
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[1791]from "EB"--20 February 2007:
Hi!

I am trying to locate an old puzzle, or at least more information about it, as it was one that I have very fond memories of. Unfortunately, I don't know much about it, except that it is discontinued.
It was a relatively large (500-1000 piece), double-sided puzzle. Some of the piece were unique shapes, such as birds and fish. Both sides showed a variety of world record lists (either Guinness or Ripleys- I am not sure which) with a humorous cartoon depiction accompanying most, on a white background. The only distinct picture I remember on it was a cartoon grey moon with large craters and and angry face, with a cartoon rocket poking out its eye (with the record or date of a rocket of sorts hitting the moon) - it was a little tongue in cheek sort of puzzle. The two sides were also rotated (if you completed it and then flipped it over, one side was a different orientation). It was bought at a flea market in the mid-eighties and was made of standard puzzle cardboard, if that helps with a time frame. I would really appreciate any information you might be able to give me regarding this puzzle as I have never seen or heard of one like it.

Thank you very much!
"EB"
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from Jim McW--25 February 2007:
We don't recognize this one. Does this sound familiar to anyone?
Thanks, Jim McW
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[1792]from "HH"--21 February 2007:
Hello my name is ______ and I am searching for a puzzle that I had for about 10 years. The puzzle was called " East Coast Meets West Coast ", and it was made by Milton Bradley , though I dont know the year. I bought it at a rummage sale still sealed. It took me 3 weeks, off and on, to complete it, but when I did, I glued it and framed it. A year ago I moved and the movers I used were very clumsy in my opinion and one of them misplaced my framed masterpiece. They did give me a lowsy compensation but, none the less, I have to find that puzzle. The puzzle that I am looking for was of San Francisco and New York City joined together by the Golden Gate Bridge and in the middle of both bays was the Staue of Liberty. Do you think you could help me out?
"HH"
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from Jim McW--25 February 2007:
We believe this was a 1500-piece puzzle of the MB JUST IMAGINETM series.:
East Meets West" East Meets West "

We believe these were issued in the mid-1980's.
Thanks, Jim McW
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from "HH"--27 February 2007:
First of all I would like to thank you for taking the time to search for this puzzle. You have found my puzzle and made a tear roll down my cheek. I'm not too sure but I think the # of pieces was 1500 - 2000 the end result was a big beautiful puzzle.... Thank You once again.
"HH"
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from "BB"--2 March 2007:
...this puzzle...is numbered 4561-1. It has 1500 pieces. It is one from the series, Just Imagine. It is dated 1985.
"BB"
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[1793]from "JDG"--27 February 2007:
Hi,

I am looking for a jigsaw puzzle my mother and I used to work over and over. This would have been in the early 60ís. The picture was of a wagon train at sunset. The pieces were thick cardboard, and many didnít interlock Ė they just fit in a space made by the other pieces. Somewhere along the way, this puzzle was lost, and I would like to find it. Does this sound familiar? It could have been a Milton Bradley puzzle, but I really donít remember. Can you help?

"JDG"
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from Jim McW--25 February 2007:
Chris McCann, in his Master Pieces: An Art History of Jigsaw Puzzles, includes " Pioneers ", by Frank Tenney Johnson, " Covered Wagons ", by F. Grayson Sayre, " On the Oregon Trail ", by Frederick D. Ogden, as well as one or two others.
There is several versions of TUCO puzzles along this line.:
On the Oregon Trail" On the Oregon Trail ", by Frederick D. Ogden
Covered Wagons" Covered Wagons ", by F. Grayson Sayre

Can anyone think of others?
Thanks, Jim McW
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[1794]from "CN"--27 February 2007:
Please can anyone help me with this old jigsaw puzzle which I bought in a charity shop a week ago? It is made from plywood and has an old but brightly coloured picture. I can't find any information on the subject. It has 160 pieces, retailed for 2/6 shillings and came in a very sturdy red box. The box seems to have been stored in a shed and the label has snail damage to it.

The top of the label says "The Pines", the picture says "The Mail Coach" and to the bottom left is the name Simpkin Marshall Ltd, London.

Curiously, I found another vintage jigsaw with the same picture on it, but 110 pieces, made by Leisure Hour.

I am thoroughly confused!

Kind regards,

"CN"
The Mail Coach" The Mail Coach ", SIMPKIN & MARSHALL Ltd, London.
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from Jim McW--4 March 2007:
Art (and puzzle) subjects related to coaches, stage coaches, mail coaches, etc., are rather numerous. Popular paintings and illustrations were often used by different puzzle makers for their puzzle subjects. Your puzzle probably dates from about 1940.
There seems to have been a number of different puzzle lines with the title "Leisure Hour", mostly active between 1900 and 1940. Here's an example:
Queen Elizabeth addressing her Troops" Queen Elizabeth addressing her Troops ", LEISURE HOUR.
Thanks, Jim McW
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from "CN"--4 March 2007:
Hello James

Many, many thanks for your hard work in finding the answer to my question. I think your website is fantastic and I have used it several times to find information about jigsaw puzzles.

Best wishes,

"CN"
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[1795]from "AA"--27 February 2007:
Hi--Love your website. Could you help me identify this vintage children's puzzle and tell me about what year it's from. It's thick cardboard, has 2 sides & about 28 pieces.
Is it rare or does it have any value? Any idea of who made it?
Thanks a bunch!
"AA"
Aeroplane" Aeroplane ", Aeroplane Puzzle, MILTON BRADLEY CO.TM, 1930's.
Dirigible" Dirigible "
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from Jim McW--4 March 2007:
Anne Williams illustrates this same puzzle on page 198 of her Jigsaw Puzzles: An Illustrated History and Price Guide. She lists it as double-sided, die-cut cardboard, and made by MILTON BRADLEY CO., in the 1930's. We have added the info to your pictures.
Thanks, Jim McW
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[1796]from "CJZ"--5 March 2007:
Does anyone know whether Pauline Jackson painted a picture that was a kitchen scene at Thanksgiving with a lot of commotion going on, kids under foot and a pet or two in the action. I believe one woman is taking the turkey out of the oven.

Where can I find more information on Pauline Jackson? My internet searches all come up blank. Thanks for any help you can give me.
"CJZ"
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from Jim McW--8 March 2007:
We haven't found very much information, either, but what little we have found is on our PAULINE JACKSON page. Your description sounds familiar, but I can't quite place it. Can anyone help?
Thanks, Jim McW
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[1797]from "RP"--6 March 2007:
I am searching for information on Jig Time Picture Puzzles. I have one called "Prairie Fire"
"RP"
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from Jim McW--8 March 2007:
Jig Time puzzles were made by CHILCOTE, during the 1930's. See our SALE PAGE 6 for one example.
Thanks, Jim McW
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[1798]from "R9"--9 March 2007:
Have you [heard of] any puzzles with the artwork of a fellow named Gene Stocks? It is a series called World Class Wildlife. I have 2 puzzles by him. If not, have you any idea where I may obtain such puzzles?
"R9"
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from Jim McW--8 March 2007:
We have not heard of this series or this artist. Can anyone comment?
Thanks, Jim McW
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[1799]from "DP"--12 March 2007:
PuzzleHistory.com,

Hello, my name is __________. I'm trying to find a puzzle called "The Golden Wood" based on artwork by Ruth Sanderson. I rememeber that a friend of mine had a copy while we were growing up but now I can't find this puzzle anywere. I know that some of Sanderson's book are out of print... is the same true with this puzzle? I would appreciate any feedback or suggestions you might have. Thanks,
"DP"
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from Jim McW--15 March 2007:
Thanks for bringing this artist's wonderful work to our attention! Puzzles featuring Ruth Sanderson's work may appear on several internet puzzle stores, but I'm reasonably sure that you will find at least one version of "Golden Wood" on Nancy Ballhagen's Puzzles.
Thanks, Jim McW
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[1800]from "PT"--14 March 2007:
Hi, can anyone tell me what year Jaymar produced the WACKY PACKAGES puzzle. I have seen it [described as] being 1973, but have seen elsewhere the year 1983. The side of puzzle box has printed Topps chewing gum MCMLXXIII, but I am not sure if that is a date for the puzzle or a copyright date for Topps. Thank you
"PT"
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from Jim McW--18 March 2007:
The enquirer in no. 848, Page 58, suggests the 1970's, and we suspect that is the likelier decade. Does anyone have certain information on this dating?
Thanks, Jim McW
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[1801]from "AD"--17 March 2007:
Hi
I am curious on statistics of how people put a puzzle together. I think most people start with the edges and work inward. Some people start with a color and build that way.

Thanks
"AD"
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from Jim McW--17 March 2007:
I think it might be difficult to gather meaningful (numerical) statistics on the different ways people approach the assembly of jigsaw puzzles. However, we can at least list some of the basic strategies or variations:
1) Start with the edge or border pieces, then work on the interior pieces.
2) Start with a particular color or pattern and build blocks or groups of the puzzle pieces, then look for bridges between the groups.
3) Some people may occasionally assemble the puzzle with the picture facing down, so that the picture side is not visible.
4)Some people use the guide picture (if available) to help assemble the puzzle; others don't.

Any other variations?
Thanks, Jim McW
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[1802]from "JB"--13 March 2007:
Hi,
I was wondering if you could give me any advice on how to glue and mount a shaped puzzle? I have a puzzle that I would like to mount and it's in the shape of a car and I'd like to make the mounting surface the same shape as the puzzle. Plus when I have the puzzle mounted what is the best way to hang it?
"JB"
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from Jim McW--18 March 2007:
You can go to our FAQ page for some basic information, but we have never dealt with this specific problem, so we're posting it here for anyone out there who may have some experience with this sort of situation. Any ideas?
Thanks, Jim McW
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from Keith--18 March 2007:
Hi Jim,
As you are probably aware I hate glued puzzles, this ruins them for future collectors and in effect makes them worthless.
The method I use for this particular problem is to make up the puzzle and lay it on a suitable material (usually card) of the same thickness or very slightly thicker (very firm), and large enough to leave good edges all round.At least 4".

Draw round the puzzle with a soft pencil, now you have an outline of the shape, cut out the shape wth a sharp craft knife a fraction larger than the puzzle outline. (Not too much). It is best if you have chosen a card colour to suit the puzzle (if not, this can be rectified by using a suitable coloured paper also cut to shape and then pasting on top).

Now glue the card onto another card of similar size to form a backing sheet for your puzzle. Make very sure that all the edges are properly glued together, put suitable weights on your cut out to hold it down (very flat) whilst the glue sets. [Note by Jim McW - I believe the piece of card (cardboard) which is the same shape as the puzzle will be discarded. You will be gluing the OUTSIDE portion of the cut card to another card of the some outer dimensions, so as to leave a recess the same size and shape as the puzzle which you wish to frame.]

Now the puzzle can be slid into the cut out frame and the whole thing put into a suitable picture frame.and the outside edges trimmed to suit the frame size.

Once the glass is placed on top the puzzle cannot move if you have the card thickness correct.

Regards,

Keith
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[1803]from "LB"--28 February 2007:
Arghhhh

Please help me with the answer to my problem

I have the 3d sculpture puzzle (mount rushmore)

I need the solution can you e-mail it to me

My kids are driving me nuts!!!!!!!

Thank-you in advance
"LB"
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from Jim McW--4 March 2007:
Dear puzzler,
Sorry, we are not familiar with this puzzle. We're not even sure what kind of 3D puzzle you've got. What is the brand?
Can you send a picture, or a photocopy, at least, of the box?
Thanks, Jim McW
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from "LB"--4 March 2007:
This is the 3d sculpture puzzle by Milton Bradley (a challenging layer puzzle?)

Thank you for your reply I hope you can help. It is similar to the ones you already have on your website: - the kiss and Venus de Milo

I would love to complete this as like I said the kids are driving me nuts...
"LB"
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from Jim McW--7 March 2007:
Dear "LB",
We have never seen one of these, and we had never even heard of this one until you wrote. The only help we can possibly give is for you to find our "cheat sheet". [Look at no. 643 on Page 45 of our Q&A pages.] ....the solution to your puzzle may be a little different, but it may just be based on the same principle, so that may give you some clues. Let us know how it turns out.
Thanks, Jim McW
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from "LB"--13 March 2007:
Puzzle is now complete and [here's] the picture as promised, of course you can show the picture on your website. Also a link to the solution is:-

http://www.hasbro.com/common/instruct/3DSculptures-MountRushmore.pdf

Thanks for your time and effort in trying to help

Regards
"LB"

Mt Rushmore" Mt Rushmore ", 3D SCULPTURE PUZZLE, by MILTON BRADLEYTM ***************
from Jim McW--18 March 2007:
We thank you for the great link and the photo, as well!
Jim McW
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This is PAGE ONE HUNDRED NINE of the Questions and Answers section of puzzlehistory.com.

Chris McCann's book,Master Pieces: the Art History of Jigsaw Puzzles.

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