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ESCAPE FROM FRAMES

[1766]from "ROC"--10 January 2007:
Re no. 1163, Page 75, and no. 1583, Page 99:
Dear Puzzler
I have just discovered your web site, I was interested in the comments by Keith, 2004. as I was given a Dragon Land puzzle as a child 65 to 70 years ago. It is missing the box , but the trays and lid still survive and the puzzle is still fascinating to all the children who come into my home. If you are interested, I have attached photos of the puzzle and the lid illustration. Two small pieces are missing . I must try to replace them. Cherio.
"ROC"
Dragon's Land" Dragon's Land ",
Dragon's Landbox lid illustration, " Dragon's Land ".
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from Jim McW--12 January 2007:
We are very grateful for your sharing this treasure with us. Keith says this is a quite scarce puzzle. This is the first time we have had the chance to see a picture of it.
Thanks, Jim McW
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from "BB"--22 May 2007:
RE: puzzle by Mrs Elspeth Eagle-Clarke: No. 3036 DRAGONSLAND 10/6 No. 3035 ELFIN 7/6

Patent No. 407185

I have found a photo on your website of a puzzle that is identical to one we have in our family. We also have two small pieces missing and also the box is missing, but our missing pieces are different from the ones shown in the photo on your website.

My grandfather was a gardener to a wealthy family who passed this puzzle on to him as a gift.

The puzzle is simply beautiful and was the source of hours of joy to me as a child.

It not only gave me a rich visual source of inspiration but also conjured up many stories in my imagination. I have gone on to produce many images for children of my own and I am sure I gained so much from access to this puzzle when I was small.

Our own children also enjoy it.
"BB"
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[1767]from "MT"--12 January 2007:
Hi There,

I have a Look Alikes Joan Steiner puzzle entitled 'Hotel', it is my first experience of this kind of puzzle and is proving an enjoyable family activity. However, I was wondering if anybody had a list of the 117 everyday objects that can be found in the puzzle as it was 2nd hand.....don't know if such a thing came with the puzzle as box gives no indication but maybe somebody out there would know one way or the other....?

Happy puzzling folks!

*MT*
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[1768]from "UW"--9 January 2007:
Re no. 415, Page 30, and no. 659, Page 46: I found this on a web site, I hope it helps you. I had a hard time finding a solution also.:
http://home.comcast.net/~stegmann/assembly.htm#packing

"UW"
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[1769]from "NT"--19 January 2007:
I have collected Charles Wysocki puzzles and know that the original maker puzzles are worth more to collectors. Are Heronim Wysocki puzzles made by Spillsbury considered more collectible than the newer ones made today? Thanks

"NT"
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from Jim McW--20 January 2007:
Many of the questions we receive concern the values of vintage jigsaw puzzles. For general discussion of values, see our FAQ page.
However, I will discuss briefly here the concept of the relative values of older and new versions of puzzles. The more popular a puzzle (or any collectible), the easier it is to find buyers and the more competition there may be for the supply. The rarer a given collectible, that is, the shorter the supply, the higher the price may tend to be, given a demand for it. It is possible for a collectible to be extremely rare, but not much in demand, and therefore to fetch a disappointing price. On the other hand, a comparatively common puzzle may sometimes command a premium, simply because there is sufficient demand, relative to supply.
Now, as to the question at hand, an earlier, scarcer variety may bring more on the market than a later, more widely available variety. For instance, the earliest Charles Wysocki puzzles of which we are aware were the PARKER BROS.TM (1970's) and COLORFORMSTM Wysocki's (1980's). These tend to bring higher prices (when one can find them) than the recent Wysocki puzzles.
As for Heronim puzzles, we are not sure how much earlier the SPILSBURYTM series was published than Heronim series by other companies, but we suspect not much earlier. (Can anyone give us information on dates of issue?)
Other factors include condition, quality, and local availability. Some brands are preferred by some collectors because of their quality or cut. Some may be more easily found in Europe and others more easily in the U.S.A. In other words, the determination of "the value" of a given collectible is a very complicated and usually imprecise art.
Thanks, Jim McW
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[1770]from "DC"--20 January 2007:
To whom it may concern . I am not very good at this computer thing but wanted to let you know I have a Tuco Interlocking Picture puzzle The -----? Moment. It is a picture of two white horses pulling a buckboard with a young boy driving and an older man next to him. It is as if the older man is teaching him to drive. The number on the box is"superb" no. 5980-6. Part of my box is torn on the surface so I dont know the real title. there is also a name of an artist painting by Detlefsen. The horses are crossing a stream and in the backround is what I believe to be a red mill. My wife and I have enjoyed well over 50 years of puzzle doing and still enjoy Tuco puzzles the best. Our chil;dren and grand children are always on the lookout for them at garage sales. If you could give me the full title ( which could be just"The Moment "), I would appreciate it. I have enjoyed your computer titles and dates as it has opened another avenue for us to look for special puzzles. Thank you for anything you can do.
"DC"
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from Jim McW--21 January 2007:
We think the title may be " The Big Moment ", but we have never seen it, so that's just a guess.
Thanks, Jim McW
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[1771]from "SS"--21 January 2007:
Hello,
Thought it rather amusing that almost every time I've done large puzzles, there will be a time I'll say " there must some pieces missing or there must be too many pieces" but it's always just the right amount. However, I just completed a 750 pc " African Lion" puzzle and there were actually 2 extra pieces. although they looked like they would have belonged , they did not duplicate any other piece.
This was from a 3 Deluxe puzzle box # 403010.
Just a note of interest.
"SS"
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from Jim McW--22 January 2007:
This is yet another confirmation of what we have been saying: that it is impossible to say for sure whether a puzzle is complete, until and unless one completes it.
Thanks for the information, Jim McW
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[1772]from "KV"--22 January 2007:
Re: No. 1711, Page105:
concerning the Superman puzzles, I own a 300 piece, Red Box, titled "Superman the Avenger". It is # 1505 and dated 1940 Saalfield, Ohio.
I am including photos for any updates to Q&A.
Superman the Avenger" Superman the Avenger ", SAALFIELD, 1940.
boxbox, " Superman the Avenger "
"KV"
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[1773]from "JE"--22 January 2007:
Hi fellow puzzlers,
I recently recieved a puzzle that I've fallen in love with and would like to find more by the same artist. It is a shaped fish puzzle made by Spilsbury Puzzle Co., artist Herb Schwartz, and I have a catalog page from Spilsbury dated Fall 1997. (Spilsbury No. 3112).....

It states on the box that it is "Issue No. 1 of the Exotic fish series".... A perusal of Spilsbury's site has not turned up any more by this artist.... Does anyone know if there were actually any more in this series?

I have found a listing of Herb Schwartz's stunning wooden puzzles by ELMS puzzles.
Thanks greatly
"JE"
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[1774]from "BC"--23 January 2007:
Re: fantasy space puzzle
About 16 years ago I bought a puzzle (2 times because I kept losing pieces) that was around 10000 pieces and it was a translucent pegasus and unicorn in space and had small planets in the background. I dont know anything more about it but I have become interested in it lately due to the challenge it holds. can you tell me who makes it or what the name of it was or anything about it, pretty please?
"BC"
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from Jim McW--24 January 2007:
Is this it? Not 10,000 pieces, but perhaps you meant 1000.
Fantasia Forever" Fantasia Forever ", American Publishing CompanyTM
Thanks, Jim McW
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from "BC"--25 January 2007:
You guys really ARE awesome! That's the puzzle alright. I am a bit embarrassed that I misremembered the amount of pieces. with only 1000 it seems like it would be a piece of cake now, but I do alot more puzzles now. I have them on a wall, and they are all fantasy types. Thanks so very, very very much!
"BC"
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[1775]from "JH"--25 January 2007:
Hi,

I was wondering if there is a term to describe a person who does jigsaw puzzles. For example, is it a Puzzler? Is it a Puzzlelover?

I'd love to know!
Thanks,
"JH"
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from Jim McW--28 January 2007:
Well, we usually refer to people who like puzzles as " puzzlers ". There are some who call them " Dissectologists ", from an old term for jigsaw puzzle, " dissected picture ". We suspect that either term may cause a bit of bepuzzlement, in one quarter or another, but that is fitting, too, in the world of puzzles!
Thanks, Jim McW
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[1776]from "FD"--25 January 2007:
I have been captured by a puzzle that seems to be a Milton Bradley puzzle titled Animal Awareness Fine Feathers. This 1000 piece puzzle was copyrighted in 1997 by Art Impressions of Canoga Park, California.

After spending hours and hours working on the puzzle I have been able to confirm that there are a significant number of pieces missing. Never willing to give up on a challenge I am hoping to find a complete puzzle so that I can achieve closure on this interesting puzzle.

I have also spent hours touring the internet looking for a complete replacement puzzle.....

Can anyone help?
"FD"
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[1777]from "AF"--26 January 2007:
John Rogers Picture called Peaceful Village
I would like some info on John Rogers and this picture if you have any, the back has a stamp on it that says This Is A Genuine Treasure Art Product MASTERPIECE
"AF"
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from Jim McW--28 January 2007:
We have heard of John Rogers' work, but we know little about him. His work has apparently been used for jigsaw puzzles by TUCO and WHITMAN GOLD SEAL, circa 1940's-1950's.
Can anyone tell us more about this artist or his work?

In the meantime, here's some pictures that we have received, that are identified as his work.:
Church Road" Church Road ", WHITMAN GUILDTM
Peaceful Village" Peaceful Village ", TUCOTM [1950's?]
Peaceful Village" Peaceful Village ", WHITMAN GOLD SEALTM [c. 1950's?]
Red Barn" Red Barn ", TUCOTM [1940's?]
Red Barn" Red Barn ", WHITMAN GUILDTM [c. 1940's?]
Rural Winter" Rural Winter ", TUCOTM [c. 1940's?]
Water Mill" Water Mill ", WHITMAN GOLD SEALTM [c. 1950's?]

Any others?
Thanks, Jim McW
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[1778]from "PDC"--27 January 2007:
Arrow's James Bond Thunderball 375 pieces
James Bond" James Bond ", ARROWTM [c. 1950's?]
James Bond" James Bond ", ARROWTM [c. 1950's?]

Here are some pictures of an Arrow James Bond puzzle. Maybe they are of any use to you for your site?

Best regards,
"PDC"
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from Jim McW--28 January 2007:
Our viewers will enjoy these!
Thanks, Jim McW
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[1779]from "JS"--29 January 2007:
Hi,

Just found your site. Just to pass on some information. I worked for J W Spears in 1983, I had opportunity when on holiday to visit the Hayter factory. Unfortunately, I cannot remember where it is, but I remember it was on the coast.

I had a tour of the factory and saw the machine where they cut the Gold box puzzles. The man explained to me that four boards were put together and he cut four at once..... He said when he fancied he would cut a shape such as a boat etc. They also told me that when a puzzle was returned because a piece was missing, there were two old ladies who were twins who would do the puzzle, then he would cut the missing piece.

When I worked for Spears, the Gold Box puzzles were stocked by Harrods, Hamleys and the Toymaster chain. Just thought I would write as you said no two the same had been found. Well I know for a fact that there would have been four the same of every puzzle. Now I have children of my own, I am looking for one.

Regards

"JS"
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from Jim McW--30 January 2007:
You're probably referring to Keith's comment in no. 880, Page 60. I'm not sure that he meant to say that each puzzle was absolutely unique.
Thanks, Jim McW
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from Jim McW--31 January 2007:
Referring, again, to Keith's comment in no. 880, Page 60, Brian Price, in his 1999 booklet, Victory Jigsaw Puzzles, says that there is definitive evidence of stack cutting in Gold Box puzzles, but that the puzzles cut in such a way need not necessarily have borne the same pictures. Further, he says, "...no one person has ever reported two puzzles of the same picture in the Gold Box Series."
As to the location of the factory, it was in Boscombe, Dorset, near Bournemouth.
Thanks, Jim McW
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[1780]from "DM"--30 January 2007:
Hello,

I am looking for a specific puzzle which depicts a home much like the puzzle "Christmas House" by Springbok. Instead of people, there are bears in the house and they are all doing wintery, people activities like watching t.v. or napping or making cookies. As a child, I used to put this puzzle together repeatedly; sometimes more than once a day. Please help me find this puzzle, I am going insane without it. I don't know the company but my mom swears it must have been a Hallmark/Springbok. I was unsucessful in my attempts to locate this puzzle on every site I went to. If you can help me locate even the name of this puzzle I will be very grateful. My ultimate goal is to find a complete copy, naturally. Thank you very much for your time.

Sincerely,
"DM"
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from Jim McW--31 January 2007:
We found these possibilities:
" Bear-y Christmas " (1994)
" A Beary, Merry Christmas " (1988)
" Christmas Teddy Bears " (1985)
All by SPRINGBOKTM
I can't find in any pictures of any of these.
Thanks, Jim McW
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from Jim McW--6 February 2007:
There is also:
Bears Repeating" Bears Repeating ",
(1985), SPRINGBOKTM
Thanks, Jim McW
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[1781]from "PES"--31 January 2007:
Hello,

Hello, my name is _______ and I have a 2-sided puzzle made by "The Puzzle Factory" New York, of Copyright Year 1970. It is in very good shape but I know nothing about puzzles....? Over 500 pieces.
Can you tell me a little about it? I never even heard of a two-sided puzzle, honestly and I'm in my 40'S.
Reception of General Louis Kossuth" Reception of General Louis Kossuth ", by E. Percel, THE PUZZLE FACTORYTM
Coryell's Ferry" Coryell's Ferry ", by Joseph Pickett, THE PUZZLE FACTORYTM
box inscription" box inscription "
box inscription" box inscription "

Thank You,
"PES"
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from Jim McW--3 February 2007:
We understand that THE PUZZLE FACTORY was the "precursor" of the GREAT AMERICAN PUZZLE FACTORYTM.

Two-side jigsaw puzzles have a long history, going back to the 19th Century or earlier. The earliest jigsaw puzzles were often called Dissected Pictures or Dissected Maps, and it was not at all unusual for a puzzle to bear a map on one side and a picture on the other side. Two-side puzzles remain very popular to this day. Some of them are considered to be among the most difficult jigsaw puzzles in existence.
Thanks, Jim McW
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[1782]from "D"--4 February 2007:
Hi,
Was wondering if anyone you know does what I decided to do after my husband and I had been doing puzzles .....usually 1000 pieces......for the last 30-35 years or so.

About 10 years ago.......I decided to take pictures of the completed puzzles and put them in small albums to enjoy long after we had done the puzzles. We usually do 8 to 10 in the winter time.

Also I found a perfect place to pass on finished puzzles..........senior citizen homes or recreation centers I should say. They are thrilled to get them......well ours was anyhow...........we lived in El Paso, Texas then and they said after they were finished with them.......I gave them 50 or 60 when we moved......anyhow that they would pass them on to the next senior citizen recreation place..........there were about 8 or 9 in the large El Paso area. That was so much fun passing them on to people that would certainly enjoy them. Love the puzzle history site. Thanks for it.
"D"
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from Jim McW--4 February 2007:
We highly recommend this manner of disposition for your "old" puzzles. We also recommend hospitals, especially convalescent hospitals. Puzzles of all kinds, jigsaw, mechanical, crossword, and others, are all quite therapeutic for many patients, not to mention the rest of us.
Thanks, Jim McW
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[1783]from "CC"--6 February 2007:
Have you heard of the Masterpiece Collection by Malco and if so What is the history of this company? I have found 2 of their puzzles that are religious but there is nothing on your site about this company. I am also affixing a photo of one of the puzzles.:
Luberoff's Adoration of the Magi" Luberoff's Adoration of the Magi ", published by MALCOTM
"CC"
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from Jim McW--4 February 2007:
We have to say that we know nothing about this puzzle publisher. Can anyone enlighten us?
Thanks, Jim McW
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[1784]from "DH"--7 February 2007:
I was wondering about the history of the 3 d puzzles. I am teaching an art class of 7th graders how to use nine 2" wooden blocks to create a puzzle. They must design a pictures for each of the six sides. I know that these type of puzzles were once popular but don't know where to look for info. I need background information to share with the class.
Thanks for your help
"DH"
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from Jim McW--9 February 2007:
For some previous discussions of the history of block puzzles, see No. 771, Page 54, and No. 1229, Page 78. There are some others which you can find with our search page. (Just type in " block " or " blocks ". We include a few excerpts from the discussions, below.

We may add that three-dimensional (or 3-D) puzzles takes in a bit wider variety of puzzles, including the so-called " contour " jigsaw puzzles, which have pieces of different thicknesses, to give a kind of " bas relief " effect; the " sculpture " variety, which seem most usually to consist of slices of a sculpture which can be arranged on a spindle or spindles to reconstruct the sculpture; and the many different kinds of block and mechanical puzzles. Except for the " contour " jigsaw puzzles, most of these are on the fringe of the field of jigsaw puzzles, which is the focus of this website. However, there are some links on our LINKS page which will take you to other websites which can tell you more about these other kinds of puzzles. I think many people would consider block puzzles and contour puzzles to be relevant to jigsaw puzzles, as do we.
Thanks, Jim McW
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from "MS"-13 April 2003:
....I got [a block puzzle] in Frankfurt, Germany 6 or 8 years ago. I collect these block puzzles. They are more common in Europe and Asia than in America. The Chinese and Japanese have many varieties. Ravenhurst (a German toy company) also has quite a selection. Recently, I have seen these puzzles for Builder Bob, Tommy the Tank, Madeline, and a number of other children's picture books. I have eight pieces of a 9-piece plastic Curious George block picture puzzle that Yoplait sold as a premium in 1999; I am looking for the ninth piece. Most of the American made puzzles of this type are plastic; I have a Winnie the Pooh one that is rectangular rather than square blocks. Most of the European and Asian puzzles are wooden. They are hard to find, but they are out there. Now and then one appears on internet auction sites or at a thrift store, like the Goodwill or Salvation Army. I wish I knew of a site to inquire about others who had block picture puzzles to sell. Let me know if you run across any for sale. Thanks.
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from Keith--23 April 2003:
Hi Jim,
I was surprised that these seem to be less well known on your side of the Atlantic. Picture Blocks go well back into the eighteen hundreds, they were certainly quite common by the 1850's being halfway between bricks and jigsaw puzzles, they were lithographed and hand-coloured. In the same way as jigsaw puzzles , maps were often used but perhaps more common were the alphabet blocks or bricks and often combinations of any of these elements. Unlike the jigsaw puzzle though they could of course just be piled up in any old order to make anything the child fancied. Like many of the early toys German manufacturers were major players and exported all over the world.
Keith
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from Keith--10 February 2007:
For further, in-depth study, see: " Play Orbit ", published by Studio International, from a showing at Royal National Eisteddfod of Wales, Flint, 4-9 August 1969, edited by Jasia Reichardt.
" Toy With the Idea ", published by Norfolk Museums Services, 1980.
" Yesterdays Children ", by Sally Kevill-Davis, including mention of a set of Butter's " Tangible Arithmetic and Geometry for Children ", published in 1852, which consisted of 144 oak cubes with instructions on how to use the cubes for addition, subtraction, multiplication and division, as well as fractions, proportions and geometry. The actual set is in the Pinto Collection at the Birmingham Museum and Art Gallery.
Keith
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[1785]from "SE"--8 February 2007:
I have an very old TUCO PICTURE PUZZLE 350 to 400 pieces, non interlocking. The box does not resemble any of the boxes you show, but it does resemble SM 01 OR SM 02 1932. The box is cream color, and has a label on the end telling number of pieces and the name of TUCO PICTURE PUZZLE then under that subject and below in highlighted cream color it reads Cleopatra. It shows a picture of a black lantern, and the rest of the top has (embossed) a three leaf design on it, a cream color. The back does not list other puzzles, but does have the logo "Good puzzles, like good books, are a source of pleasure, solace and instruction." It goes on for five more paragraphs and then at the bottom has TUCO WORK SHOPS, Lockport, N.Y.
This is a 15x 19 puzzle and about 1/4 in. thick, it is a beautifully colored picture of CLEOPATRA and a peacock, lying on the fourth step of stairs covered with colorful red throws. In the foreground is a bush with flowers and, in the background. are Egyptian buildings. Thank you,
"SE"
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from Jim McW--9 February 2007:
According to Chris McCann's List of Tuco Titles, " Cleopatra " only occurs in the LG10 series, issued about the mid-1930's. As I recall, this series came in a rather large variety of box patterns and colors.
Thanks, Jim McW
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from "SE"--18 February 2007:
Below are pictures as you requested..... My picture is much more vivid than it shows on my attachment.
Cleopatra" Cleopatra ", TUCO
boxbox, " Cleopatra "
"SE"
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from Jim McW--25 February 2007:
Many of the TUCO puzzles of this era contained 357 pieces. Some people claim to have found puzzle cut identically, but we suspect this rarely happens. See the TUCO website for more details on matching up puzzle cuts.
Thanks, Jim McW
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This is PAGE ONE HUNDRED EIGHT of the Questions and Answers section of puzzlehistory.com.

Chris McCann's book,Master Pieces: the Art History of Jigsaw Puzzles.

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