Questions

&
Answers......Page 107

puzzlehistory.com
Click on small images to see larger images.
Click on the "BACK" button to return.
ESCAPE FROM FRAMES

[1745]from "KT"--20 November 2006:
Hi there.

I was hoping to learn some more about this puzzle. I am sure it from a movie but cannot find this image anywhere else. It is likely not a jigsaw as it is little squares that you pop into place… it is quite tricky though. Some of the pieces are still not in place properly. I would love to know about what type of puzzle this is, if anyone knows the scene, or the movie it is from for that matter. It looks a little like Bette Davis… I would also like to know how old it is. I found it in a plain envelope in amongst a box of magazines from the 50’s I took home from the local landfill I work at part time!

The puzzle board is in two pieces and connects with an innie and outie…

I love your site and appreciate your work!
"KT"
old south scene
old south scene
, from 1930's movie.
***************
from Jim McW--20 November 2006:

The puzzle is almost certainly a SQUARECUT puzzle, made by Squarecut Puzzle Co., in New York, in the 1930's (and early 1940's), according to Anne Williams' book, Jigsaw Puzzles: An Illustrated History and Price Guide. She lists two movies as being among the titles: " Random Harvest " and " Keeper of the Flame ".
The title of the puzzle is " The Farewell ". The scene depicted in this puzzle appears to be set in the American Civil War, in the Deep South. Possibilities include " The Old Maid " and " So Red the Rose ". Does anyone know the name of the movie?
Thanks, Jim McW
***************
from Jim McW--24 November 2006:

We now suspect that there may have been a similar series issued by SOMERVILLE, in Canada. This puzzle may be from that series.
Thanks, Jim McW
***************
from "TO"--11 March 2007:
I believe your second post for this question is correct - I have a Somerville squarecut puzzle* from a series called "Scenes from Famous Movies in Full Color".
Titles are:

- At the Farm Gate
- The Farewell
- Tulip Time
- Gypsy Dance
- * The Ballet
- Pals

In my opinion, the scene shown seems to fit the title "The Farewell"
There are no references on the box about the movie from which the scene is taken.
See photos below.
Hope this helps!
P.S.: I've looked all over for any clues to the date of this series, without success. Do you have any info? Any idea about value?
Thank you!
"TO"
____________
The Ballet" The Ballet " boxbox
Somerville logo
Somerville logo
, " The Ballet "
text on box
text on box, " The Ballet "
***************
from Jim McW--17 March 2007:

We believe, as we say above, that these puzzles date from the 1930's or early 1940's. We've only just heard about these, so we're still learning about them. We know nothing about the value, although we assume that they are quite collectible. In any case, we don't offer appraisals, as a matter of policy and practicality. However, you can see a brief discussion of values of collectibles on our FAQ page.
Thanks, Jim McW
***************
Respond or comment (note inquiry number)

[1746]from "KT2"--20 November 2006:
This puzzle is titled Ho, Ho, Ho, Ho, Ho, Ho... It's a collage of all different kinds of Santa's. There are 600 interlocking pieces and measures 24 x 24 inches when assembled. Twelve of the puzzle pieces are shaped like Chrismas symobls i.e. tree, snowman, etc.....

Any help you can give will be much appreciated.

Thank you,

"KT2"
***************
from Jim McW--22 November 2006:

It sounds like PZL5974, from 1985.
Thanks, Jim McW
***************
Respond or comment (note inquiry number)

[1747]from "JR"--27 November 2006:
Hi,
I am looking for a jigsaw puzzle that I had and completed in the late 70s or early 80s. I do not remember the author, but the name on the puzzle was "People are People." It is a white background with small black drawings (charactures) of people, all naked with titles under them, such as Accountant, Baker, fireman, etc. It is very cute. In the center top, the title is in red. I had it put together and backed, but alas, with all of the moves, it can no longer be found. I would like to get another one and put it together.

I have searched the web and cannot find what I am looking for and was wondering if you would be able to help me or know where I might find this.

Thank you for your time.
"JR"
***************
from Jim McW-- 7 June 2008:

We knew when you asked this question that we had seen it, but we didn't pinpoint it until now. It's a GREAT AMERICAN PUZZLE COMPANY puzzle.:
People Are People
" People Are People "
, by Paul Palnik,550 pieces, 1979.
Thanks, Jim McW
***************
Respond or comment (note inquiry number)

[1748]from "GJ"--28 November 2006:
Hi.
I came across your website on the internet and thought that maybe you could advise me. I am in possession of an unopened jigsaw puzzle dated from 1975. It is of the front page of the Wall Street Journal on Monday, July 8, 1889. The front of the box says First Edition Jigsaw Puzzle. The puzzle maker is Dow Jones & Company, Inc. 1975. I do not know how many pieces are in the puzzle because it hasn't been opened and it isn't stated on the box. Can you direct me to a place where I might get more information about this puzzle. I'd appreciate any help you can give me. Thanks in advance.
"GJ"
***************
from Jim McW--29 November 2006:

There was a series of PARKER BROS. puzzles, back in the 1960's, featuring reproductions of historic front pages of the New York Times. These included " The Sinking of the Titanic ", " Lindbergh's Flight Across the Atlantic ", " Abdication of King Edward VIII ", " VE Day 1945 ", and " The Six Day War ".
Now, there was the following puzzle:
Wall Street" Wall Street ", (?) released by Norton and Williams Dev. Co., in 1976.
It doesn't really look like an 1889 edition, though. The reference to Dow Jones & Company may mean that the puzzle was a promotional item, or simply that the copyright for the newspaper or the image belonged to that company. They've never published jigsaw puzzles, so far as I know.
Thanks, Jim McW
***************
Respond or comment (note inquiry number)

[1749]from "WC"--1 December 2006:
I would like to know what year this puzzle was made. Would you have that information?

Jaymar Walt Disney Character Picture Puzzle #8740

triple thick interlocking picture puzzle size 5 1/8 X 7

Thank you.
"WC"
***************
from Jim McW--3 December 2006:

We believe that JAYMAR was a prolific publisher of great, old jigsaw puzzles from the early 1940's until at least the late 1980's, and probably into the mid-1990's. Your puzzles sounds like a small, children's puzzle, but we don't recognize it from the little information you provide. We suspect it was issued in the 1960's or 1970's, but, again, it is difficult without a picture or more information.
Thanks, Jim McW
***************
Respond or comment (note inquiry number)

[1750]from "BH-P"--3 December 2006:
[Ref.: No. 1404, Page 87]

Peacock puzzles was started in 1853 by Edward James Peacock. He was a Baptist Reverend as well as being a Carpenter. He had worked as a Manager with Edward Wallis in London in the late 1830s early 1840s, who was a very well known Publisher, Bookseller and Map Dissector. When Wallis ceased to trade in 1847 his stock was purchased by John Passmore of 18 Fleet Street, London. Significantly John Passmore was Edward James' brother-in-law, Edward James having married Rebecca Passmore, John's elder sister, in 1833.

Edward James Peacock and his family went to Australia in 1841 where he was variously a Policeman, Missionary to the Aborigines, Schoolteacher and finally a Post Master. After some colourful adventures he returned to U.K. in 1853 having 'made his pile' and opened the Peacock & Co firm making children's furniture, toys, and notably, Dissected Maps, from 3, Adelaide Terrace/Prebend Street, London. The firm prospered until 1861 when Edward James felt the Missionary call again. He passed the firm to his son William who drove the firm forward, expanding business until it became recognised as one of the world's most prolific producers of wooden jigsaw puzzles in the late 19th Century. The early puzzles were of Dissected Maps and a Religious theme and were produced with distinctive wooden boxes with a sliding lid. Cardboard boxes were introduced at the turn of the century when wood was becoming a scarce commodity and not cost effective. William continued until 1910 when, on his death, the firm passed to his two sons William Edward and Albert Frank. Thus the firm became Peacock Bros - still working from the same address. In 1918 one of the partners, Albert Frank Peacock, left to 'do his bit' in WW1. For some reason after the War he did not return to the firm, possibly due to a family row! William Edward turned the firm into a Limited Company, No 151318 in August 1918 with a member of the Hamley family as one of the Shareholders. It is possible that Peacocks actually made some of the puzzles produced under the Hamley label at that time. The style of cutting is noticeably similar although the Hamley puzzles do not bear any attribution to Peacock.

In 1926 there was a fire at the premises, and London Fire Brigade Reports showed that two Appliances attended with nine Firemen. Extensive damage to all four floors was shown. After a rebuild, the firm continued to expand and became a victim of it's own success. The premises became too small to contain their output and new premises were built at 175/179 St Johns Street, London, in 1931. These premises still stand in 2006 and look very modern even now. At the time of entering the new premises Peacocks realised that they had to bend with the times and introduced cardboard puzzles. The toy production side of the firm had also expanded and many articles were produced from wooden bricks, parquetry mosaics, table-tennis sets, bagatelle, blackboard and easels, farm cottages and animals, Noah's Ark sets, battleships.... the list goes on.

In 1931 a final addition to, and a departure from the practical diversions, came with the introduction of Teddy Bears. All these Peacock Teddy Bears have a white cotton label with red embroidered lettering of "Peacock of London" on one of the hind pads. Oddly these Peacock Bears continued until 1939, well after Chad Valley had taken over the business.

At the height of their success, Peacock & Co. Ltd. continued until 1934 when the firm was acquired by Chad Valley. William Edward Peacock was by that time 64 years old. There were no sons from his marriage to continue the running of the firm. He died in 1936 and is buried in Abney Park Cemetery in a unique grave, the bed of which is in the style of a geometric jigsaw. A fitting memorial to a Jigsaw Puzzle Dynasty.

According to Companies House, the name Peacock & Co. Ltd. was not finally lost until 16th October, 1970. This would have been on the occasion of the formal dissolving of the name from Minutes at an Extraordinary General Meeting of the Company that had inherited the 'rights' to the name.

At the time of the transition between Peacock and Chad Valley it would seem that some of the old stock of Peacocks jigsaw puzzle boxes in bright orange with a stylised Jigsaw Puzzle motif were also utilised by Chad Valley. Some of the Peacock ones bear the name and address of the Peacock firm, others a bright blue Peacock motif. These same boxes later bear the name of Chad Valley. Probably the same wooden jigsaw cutters were also included in the take over as the style of cutting is very similar in both firms. There is a Peacock family rumour that Peacocks also cut the early GWR puzzles produced by Chad Valley, but nothing in black and white has been found to give credence to the rumour.

Kind Regards,
"BH-P"
***************
Respond or comment (note inquiry number)

[1751]from "MD"--4 December 2006:
Hello, I am trying to find a puzzle made by the Jaymar Co. It is called " Time Thru The Ages ". It's a round puzzle 19" in diameter, the number on the box is 3080. I only have the lid to the box left and would really love to have this wonderful puzzle again. I sure hope u can help me in my quest. I would appreciate any help u can give me. Thank you very much,
"MD"
***************
from Jim McW--3 December 2006:

Has anyone heard of such a puzzle? Any lead on the JAYMAR series or the subject matter? A picture?
Thanks, Jim McW
***************
Respond or comment (note inquiry number)

[1752]from "LG"--10 December 2006:
Hi,

I just picked up a box for an early Milton Bradley puzzle, but as it is referred to on the cover, “A dissected naval picture”. The “puzzle” is called “The Flag ship”, which is actually the U.S.S. Chicago and was taken from a 1893 H.G. Peabody photo in Boston harbor. The box is wooden and unfortunately the pieces are not present. Do you know anything about this puzzle made by Milton Bradley? I can send photos of it if you would like. Let me know.

Thanks!

"LG"
***************
from Jim McW--3 December 2006:

We have seen one or two of these online. Here's a very small picture:
Flag Ship Dissected Puzzle" Flag Ship Dissected Puzzle ", early MILTON BRADLEY
We would love to have better pictures for our viewers!
Thanks, Jim McW
***************
from "LG"--18 December 2006:

Jim,

Here’s the photos. I took a close up of the description. As well, I just noticed that it was first purchased or owned by what appears to be a young boy by the name of A______ N______, North Berwick, Maine. It has his name and town and state on the bottom as well as “bought March 6, 1894”. I don’t know how authentic the writing is, but if it is real, then it would be easy to date as the photo was from Sept 1893 and the purchase was made March 1894.
Flag Ship Dissected Puzzle" Flag Ship Dissected Puzzle ", early MILTON BRADLEY, boxfront illustration.
Flag Ship Dissected Puzzlephoto of the wooden box, " Flag Ship Dissected Puzzle "
from "LG", vintagecoolstuff.com
***************
from Jim McW--19 December 2006:

Below is a transcription of the description visible in the box at left, above.:

"Our picture is a lithographic reproduction from an instantaneous photograph of the U.S.S. Chicago, taken in Boston Harbor, Nov. 25, 1889, by H.G. Peabody, just before she sailed for Europe as flag-ship of the Squadron of Evolution. The Chicago may be taken as a typical vessel of the United States Navy, being of neither the largest nor the smallest class. She was built by John Roach and her cost, outside of armament, is stated to be $889,000. She would rank as a cruiser, and , although carrying a good battery, would in event of war with a first-class power be used as a commerce destroyer, her speed of about sixteen knots enabling her to overhaul a merchant steamer or escape from a large battle-ship. Although a steel vessel, she is not armored, but is what is called 'coal protected,' that is, her coal bunkers are placed between the hull and the engines.
Over the engines and steering gear the deck is of steel, one and a half inches thick.
Her length from stem to stern 334 feet 4 inches, width 48 feet 2 inches, draught of water 19 feet, displacement 4500 tons, indicated horse-power 5000. There are two four-bladed screws of 15 feet 6 inches diameter. The full sail capacity is 14,880 square feet. The main battery consists of four 8-inch breech loading rifles, eight 6-inch and two 5-inch. The secondary battery has two 6-pounder rapid-firing guns, four 47mm revolving cannon, two 1-pounder rapid-firing guns and two Gatling guns.
The 8-inch rifle fires a shell of 250 lbs with a charge of 125 lbs of powder.
The 6-inch rifle fires a shell of 100 lbs with a charge of 50 lbs of powder. The 5-inch rifle fires a shell of 60 lbs, with a charge of 30 lbs of powder.
The crew of the ship, officers and men, is about 370.
The number of officers about 20.
The number of marines about 50.
MILTON BRADLEY CO.,SPRINGFIELD, MASS.
Thanks again, Jim McW
***************
Respond or comment (note inquiry number)

[1753]from "RR"--14 December 2006:
I recently have picked up 5 Boston Bruin Puzzles all from the American Publishing Corp. of Waltham, Mass in 1971. Was wondering if anyone has a complete checklist of just the Bruin Puzzles as I am sure these were done for the cup winning Bruins. I have both Orrs, Espo, Sanderson & McKenzie. I am going to put them all together & seal them & then matte & frame. Some tell me not to seal but I think it keeps the puzzle intact better for framing. Your thoughts & comments on that? Does it make the value of Puzzle drop?
Thanks,

"RR"
***************
from Jim McW--3 December 2006:

Does anyone have such a complete checklist?
As for the question of whether to seal or not, we say, "Whatever works for you". Many, many people do seal, mount and frame their puzzles, with apparently great enjoyment and satisfactory results. We think it may eventually have a negative effect on the market value of the puzzle, but we could be wrong, even about that.
Thanks, Jim McW
***************
Respond or comment (note inquiry number)

[1754]from "DJF"--27 December 2006:
I searched your site for a jigsaw puzzle featuring Cabo San Lucas and did not find a match. Is there a jigsaw puzzle that features Cabo? If so, where would I find it.

Thank you.
"DJF"
***************
from Jim McW--29 December 2006:

Does anyone know of such a puzzle? Let us know, please.
Thanks, Jim McW
***************
Respond or comment (note inquiry number)

[1755]from "MB"--29 December 2006:
In the late fifties early sixties, my brothers and I used to get puzzles that when assembled had a picture frame border. The border was just plain woodlike, nothing fancy. We used to interchange puzzle pieces all the time as they had the same die cut. Who made this type of puzzle? I have not seen any like it on your website. There were a few fancy picture frames and some televions frames, but that was not what we had. Please help me. Thank you.
"MB"
***************
from Jim McW--29 December 2006:

Does this description sound familiar to anyone? Let us know, if so, please.
Thanks, Jim McW
***************
Respond or comment (note inquiry number)

[1756]from "SP"--29 December 2006:
Hello

I was wondering if this jigsaw would be of interest on your website. It was brought over to the UK by my GGuncle, possibly in the 50s/60s. It is very well used & has been a favourite within our family for at least four generations.

All the best & hope it is of interest
"SP"
Sands Harbour Bridge" SANDS Harbour Bridge ", JOHN SANDS PTY. LTD. [We believe this is known as the Harbour Bridge, Sydney, Australia - Jim McW]
Sands Harbour Bridgeback, " Sands Harbour Bridge Jigsaw Puzzle "
***************
from Jim McW--30 December 2006:

We believe this is known as the Harbour Bridge, Sydney, Australia.
The puzzle does appear to be from the 1950's or early 1960's.
Thanks very much! Jim McW
***************
Respond or comment (note inquiry number)

[1757]from "JT"--30 December 2006:
Hello,
Do you know if you can get prints of puzzles, suitable for framing. I have a Kodacolor puzzle # 20508, titled Thatched Cottage that I really love. I have gone to Rose Art Website, no luck and have tried to pull up the manufacturer Warren Industries in Lafayette, IN., again no luck. Any information you could provide would be greatly appreciated.

Thank you,
"JT"
***************
from Jim McW--30 December 2006:

We have seldom heard of anything like print versions of recent jigsaw puzzles or "uncut" jigsaw puzzles. On the other hand, it was once rather common practice for the same illustrations to be used for calendars, prints, jigsaw puzzles, and other media. I would think that WARREN INDUSTRIES, as a publisher, sells wholesale only. Therefore, I would search primarily for retail outlets of prints of subject matter similar to the picture for which you are looking. Do an online search for " prints " or " art prints ".
Good luck, Jim McW
***************
Respond or comment (note inquiry number)

[1758]from "TK"--30 December 2006:
I was wondering if you knew where I could get a listing of all the puzzles that were done by Robert Blair Martin. His puzzles are great to do, but I'm sure I don't have them all and would love to have a complete list of his puzzles. Hope you can help.

Thank you
"TK"
***************
from Jim McW--30 December 2006:
We have received similar questions previously. We have gathered below the various contributions we have received.:

There are 3 Robert Blair Martin SPRINGBOK state puzzles. They are PZL5945, California, A State of Mine; PZL5946, Texas, A State of Mine, and PZL5959, Florida, A State of Mine. All of these are in large square boxes and are 1000-piecers.

There were three Verticalville puzzles:
1977 [ I ] (rectangular),
1985 (Ambassador),
1986 [ II ] (Panoramic).

" Verticalville " was the first puzzle designed by Bob Martin in 1975. He was a 1972 graduate of Arizona State university, Bob originally studied to be an architect but found he was mathmatically challenged. Since the 70's he designed more than 20 puzzles for springbok, including verticalville II. Others include: " The North Pole Toy Company 2000 " and " A Short Round of Golf ". Some pictures:
Oh, Christmas Tree" Oh, Christmas Tree ", SPRINGBOK PANORAMICTM, 700 pieces.
The Good, Old USA" The Good, Old USA ", SPRINGBOKTM, 1000 pieces.
Verticalville" Verticalville ", SPRINGBOKTM, 700 pieces.
Verticalville II" Verticalville II ", SPRINGBOK PANORAMICTM, 700 pieces.

Can anyone add to this list?
Thanks, Jim McW
***************
from "DM"--5 December 2007:

Re: 1758

I've recently (out of frustration) made a list of all the Robert Blair Martin Springboks that I've seen on Ebay. I don't know if it's complete, but it's far more than anything else on the web.

" All-Star Calliope Band ", SPRINGBOK, 1981, PZL4124
" And the Winner is... ", SPRINGBOK, 1985, PZL3203
" The Ant Ranch ", SPRINGBOK, 2000, PZL3701
" California, a State of Mind ", SPRINGBOK, PZL5945
" Computers: the Inside Story ", SPRINGBOK, 1983/4, PZL5936
" Florida, a State of Mind ", SPRINGBOK, PZL5947
" The Global Games ", SPRINGBOK, 1984, PZL5956
" The Good, Old U.S. of A. ", SPRINGBOK, 1981, PZL5925
" The Last Resort ", SPRINGBOK AMBASSADOR, 1983, PZL206j
" Mom’s Day Off ", SPRINGBOK, 1982, PZL4138
" Mountainside Park ", SPRINGBOK, 1979, PZL5914
" The North Pole Toy Company 2000 ", SPRINGBOK, 2000,
" Oh, Christmas Tree ", SPRINGBOK, 1988, PZL9809
" Pops-town ", SPRINGBOK, 1978, PZL4094
" A Short round of Golf ", SPRINGBOK, 1985, PZL2205
" The Sovereign State of Euphoria ", SPRINGBOK, 1983, PZL5934
" Space Station ", SPRINGBOK, 1990, PZL9014
" Super Dome Sunday ", SPRINGBOK, 1985, PZL4185
" Texas, a State of Mind ", SPRINGBOK, 1984, PZL5946
" Verticalville ", SPRINGBOK AMBASSADOR, 1977, PZL4085
" Verticalville II ", SPRINGBOK, 1986, PZL9804
" Welcome to Fracture Falls ", SPRINGBOK, 1985, PZL5973
" What was the name of that TV show? ", SPRINGBOK, 1985, PZL3419

"DM"
***************
from Jim McW -- 8 December 2007:

We find slightly different information in the SPRINGBOK Puzzle List, by Frances Main, concerning "Verticalville". She shows the AMBASSADOR puzzle as 420P, in 1985, and the first SPRINGBOK "Verticalville" as PZL4085, in 1977.

Can anyone add to this list?
Thanks, Jim McW
***************
Respond or comment (note inquiry number)

[1759]from "JO"--30 December 2006:
I cannot find hardly any of Schim Schimmel's puzzles online, just the 550 piece and under ones. I am looking for a specific puzzle he did which included several penguins, but am having no luck. Thanks
"JO"
***************
from Jim McW--31 December 2006:
We think you may be referring to this puzzle:
The Nurturers" The Nurturers ", 1996. The works of Schim Schimmel have been used on the jigsaw puzzles of several different companies around the world.
See no. 1692, Page 104, for a bit more information, as well as a link to One online source for SCHIMMEL puzzles. In addition, you can browse for his puzzles on the online jigsaw puzzle stores for which we have links on our LINKS Page.
Of course, the puzzle illustrated above was issued in 1996 and is unlikely to be available in retail outlets, so you may want to look on the secondary market, such as on internet auction sites.
Thanks, Jim McW
***************
Respond or comment (note inquiry number)

[1760]from "DR"--4 January 2007:
Hi,

I recently started collecting the Buffalo Games "City Character" puzzles made mostly in the late 70s thru early 90s. There are 39 puzzles in the series. I ran into a situation when I was searching for these puzzles. I came across a seller who had 2 Cincinnati puzzles. They both looked relatively similar, but there was some obvious differences. However, one puzzle was made in 1984 and the other in 1988. The seller said one manufacturer was Buffalo Games and the other was Archer. The puzzle that I assumed was the Buffalo Games puzzle (because it looked just like my other puzzles) was missing a piece so I didn't buy them. However, I came across another listing for a Cincinnati puzzle (the one that the previous seller said was Archer) and this seller was telling me it was made by Buffalo Games. There are obvious differences in the puzzle, but I'm wondering if you may know if Buffalo Games released 2 different versions or if they have ever been connected with Archer Inc? I'm not sure how familiar you are with this collection, but they are all very animated puzzles with facts about each city. Thanks for your time.

"DR"
***************
from Jim McW--6 January 2007:
We were unaware that there had been that many puzzles in this series (or should I say "these series"?) by BUFFALO GAMES (BGI). If you can supply your list of cities, we would love to provide that for our readers. We would also very much like to see any evidence that BUFFALO GAMES was publishing any puzzles prior to 1985.

Can anyone shed any light on these CITY puzzles?

Here's a start on a list of BGI City puzzles:

Austin - 513 pieces
Boston
Chicago - 504 pieces, 1988
Dallas - 504 pieces
Detroit - 504 pieces, 1988
Houston, Home of Astroworld - 504 pieces [1990?]
Kansas City
Los Angeles - 504 pieces
New York City - 504 pieces, 1988
Tampa - 513 pieces, 1991
Ville de Montreal - 513 pieces, 1991
Washington, D.C. - 504 pieces

Can anyone add to this list of titles?
Thanks, Jim McW
***************
from "DR"--7 January 2007:
The puzzles that are listed prior to 1985 are said to be manufactured by Archar, which is the property of Don Scott Associates (Buffalo, NY). It then says "City Character" products are manufactured in the USA by Buffalo Games Inc. 1984. I've tried to find out more about Archar and Don Scott and TUCO (which is also listed on some of the puzzles). I have about 16 of these to this point. The complete list is as follows:

Atlanta
Austin
Baltimore
Boston
Buffalo
Chicago
Cincinnati (2 different)
Cleveland
Columbus
Dallas
Dayton
Denver
Detroit
Erie
Houston
Indianapolis
Kansas City
London
Las Vegas
Los Angeles
Miami/Ft. Lauderdale
Minneapolis
Montreal
New Orleans
New York
Niagara Falls
Orlando
Philadelphia
Phoenix
Pittsburgh
Portland
Rochester
San Antonio
San Francisco
Seattle
St. Louis
Tampa
Toronto
Washington D.C.
I have found 2 different Cincinnati puzzles, but so far I have not found 2 of any other. If someone knows more about these, I'd be very interested. Thanks,
"DR"
Respond or comment (note inquiry number)

[1761]from "DG"--4 January 2007:
I was wondering if you might know anything about a cardboard jigsaw puzzle we have. there was no picture of it on its box, but when assembled it was an italian scene, gondolas and fancy dressed women, called "a party at murano", about 12x18 inches, the puzzle box says PICTURE WEEKLY PUZZLE SERIES E-1, very small puzzle pieces, about 400 or so with only 7 pieces missing!
was manufactured by viking manuf. co., boston ma
would anyone know when it was made....?
thank you
"DG"
***************
from Jim McW--6 January 2007:

The picture is probably similar to this:
A Party at Murano" A Party at Murano ", PICTURE PUZZLE WEEKLY (VIKING)
See also No. 778, Page 54, and our PICTURE PUZZLE WEEKLY page. These were issued during the 1930's.
Thanks, Jim McW
***************
Respond or comment (note inquiry number)

[1762]from "CH"--4 January 2007:
Re: " Legends of King Arthur ", BEPUZZLED BURIED BLUEPRINTS.:
This puzzle is going to drive me mad!!!!!
Is there anywhere I can get an enlarged picture of the puzzle? It is so hard to read the words on the box. They are too small and out of focus......Please help if you can.....

Thanks so much!!!!!!
I'm going crazy :(

"CH"
***************
from Jim McW--7 January 2007:

Can anyone send us a good JPG of this puzzle?
Thanks, Jim McW
***************
from "CH"--30 January 2007:
I finished it!!!! Yeah
Thanks for your help though.
"CH"
***************
Respond or comment (note inquiry number)

[1763]from "RD"--5 January 2007:
I have recently come into possession of two Star Puzzles (name on tin) that come in a round tin (like a film reel) about 16" or so in diameter - one of Marilyn Monroe and the other of Humphrey Bogart. Both appear to be in very good condition as to both the packaging and contents. Do you have any information on these puzzles? I have tried searching online but to no avail. I'm sure that the company is long gone but would like to know more about them. There are no other labels on the tin, inside or out, so I have no idea how many pieces there should be, how old they are, or if they are of value to someone out there. The person that I got them from believed that they had them for 30-40 years but could not remember. Any information that you might have, can dig up, or can direct me to would be greatly appreciated. Thanks in advance.

"RD"
***************
from Jim McW--7 January 2007:

Well, your search wasn't too bad.... At least it brought you to puzzlehistory.com !
However, if you had searched our site, say, for " Bogart " or for " Marilyn ", you would have quickly found our STAR section, on our Other Puzzles page, as well as some other references on various pages. The STAR series seems to have been produced between 1967 and 1969. The puzzles apparently had more than 300 pieces (with red felt backs) and some were sold in 18-inch-diameter film canisters. We only know of the puzzles listed on the cited page. However, we believe that NEIMAN-MARCUSTM may have marketed pairs of these puzzles as "Neiman-Marcus Presents a Double Feature". You can learn a little about the number of pieces as an indication of completeness and about the values of puzzles on our FAQ page.
Thanks, Jim McW
***************
Respond or comment (note inquiry number)

[1764]from "DS"--8 January 2007:
Hello,
Regarding the Tuco puzzle Sweet Innocence ... I have a large apparently unsigned oil of the same. It is framed and I'd rather not dismantle it. Could you tell me who the artist of the original is?
Thanks,
"DS"
***************
from Jim McW--11 January 2007:

According to Chris McCann, in his great book,Master Pieces: the Art History of Jigsaw Puzzles, the artist was Sir Joshua Reynolds.
Sweet Innocence"Sweet Innocence", TUCO, c. 1948-1957.
Thanks, Jim McW
***************
Respond or comment (note inquiry number)

[1765]from "JS"--10 January 2007:
Re no. 355, Page 25:
Is it this one? :
United Plates of America" United Plates of America ", SPRINGBOKTM
"JS"
***************
from Jim McW--11 January 2007:
That is the one! And, you can see the New York World's Fair plate near the top!
Thanks, Jim McW
***************
Respond or comment (note inquiry number)

This is PAGE ONE HUNDRED SEVEN of the Questions and Answers section of puzzlehistory.com.

Chris McCann's book,Master Pieces: the Art History of Jigsaw Puzzles.

   BACK to last TOUR Page

   Next TOUR Page

Copyright 2000-2010 puzzlehistory.com. All rights reserved.
Designated trademarks and brands are the property of their respective owners.